Further Resources

Environmentally sound dismantling of ships

Environmentally sound dismantling of ships

Environmentally sound dismantling of ships

Ship dismantling, also commonly referred to as ship “recycling”, is an inherently sustainable activity, the benefits of which are felt at the global level. As the term ship “recycling” implies, value is derived from the materials and equipment comprising end of life ships: the scrap steel is melted down and is commonly used in the construction industries of ship recycling countries, and equipment (engines, mechanical parts or furniture) is refurbished and reused in other industries.

The industry is based predominantly in South Asia (in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan), which according to 2010 statistics, occupies approximately 70% of the global ship recycling market. Significant recycling activity also takes place in China (19%), with Turkey and other countries occupying the remaining 10% of the market. Beaching is the predominant method of ship recycling in the South Asian Region, whilst China and some other countries employ an alternative method known as pier breaking.

The past decade has seen a substantial variation in the level of activity in the industry. The supply of ships for recycling is subject to large variations as a consequence of the global demand for seaborne transport. From 2004 to 2008, the high demand for maritime transportation resulted in a record low number of ships being sold for recycling (only between 200 to 400 ships per annum, whereas the historical average is between 700 to 800 ships).

However, with the global economic recession in recent years, the demand for maritime transportation has declined. As a result, recycling activity peaked in 2009, with some 1200 ships being sent for recycling. Figures available until September 2010 indicate that high levels of recycling activity are set to continue.

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The Global Programme for Sustainable Ship Recycling

The Global Programme for Sustainable Ship Recycling

The Global Programme for Sustainable Ship Recycling

The Global Programme for Sustainable Ship Recycling was created in 2007 to facilitate improvements in worker health and safety and environmental conditions in ship recycling countries in the South Asia region. The Programme concept has been developed in close consultation with two other international organisations with an interest and expertise in ship recycling: the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the International Labour Organisation (ILO). The Secretariat of the Basel Convention seeks to work with all ship recycling stakeholders to ensure the future sustainability of the industry.

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Meeting Documents of the ILO IMO BC Working Group - First Session (February 2005)

 
SymbolTitleSubmited byEnglish
Items: 24Load time table: 624.0068 msec  
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/1Provisional agendaSecretariat39 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/1/1Annotations and provisional timetableSecretariat59 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/1/2Rules of procedureSecretariat73.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/2Work programme of the Marine Environment Protection Committee on the issue of ship recyclingIMO Secretariat76 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/2/1Work programme of the Conference of the Parties to the Basel Convention on the issue of ship scrappingBasel Convention Secretariat47.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/2/1/Corr.1Work programme of the Conference of the Parties to the Basel Convention on the issue of ship scrapping - CorrigendaBasel Convention Secretariat36 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/2/2Abandonment of shipsIMO Secretariat44.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/3Guidelines for the development of the ship recycling planIMO Secretariat43 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/3/1Proposal for a methodology to be applied for the initial examination of the relevant ILO, IMO and BC guidelines on ship scrappingILO Secretariat55.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/4Mechanisms for the promotion of the implementation of the IMO Guidelines on Ship RecyclingIMO Secretariat40.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/5IMO technical co-operation activities on ship recyclingIMO Secretariat45.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/5/1Proposal for the development of a global/regional programme on ship scrappingSecretariat38.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/6Decision adopted by the Seventh Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Basel Convention on the Joint Working GroupBasel Convention Secretariat45 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/6/1Terms of reference for the Joint ILO/IMO/Basel Convention Working GroupSecretariat41 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/7MEPC’s views on the proposal under consideration at COP 7 regarding the flag State’s responsibility for the purposes of the application of the Basel ConventionIMO Secretariat39.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/7/1Shipbreaking activities in BangladeshBangladesh45 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/7/2Shipping industry work programme: The way ahead – practical and pragmaticInternational Shipping Federation (ISF), BIMCO, the International Association of Dry Cargo Shipowners (INTERCARGO), the International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (INTERTANKO) and the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS)108.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/7/2/Annex4Annex 4: BIMCO standard contract for the sale of vessels for demolition and recycling code name: “DEMOLISHCON” 411.22 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/7/3The IMO Guidelines on ship recycling (Annotated)Greenpeace International and the Basel Action Network (BAN)177.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/7/4BAN comments and proposals for resolving Basel Convention shipbreaking issuesBasel Action Network (BAN)126 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/8Report of the Working Group 274.5 K 367.16 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/INF/2The Relevant Decisions of the Seventh Session of the Conference of Parties to the Basel Convention on the Issue of Ship ScrappingBasel Action Network (BAN)36.5 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/INF/2/AnnexThe Relevant Decisions of the Seventh Session of the Conference of Parties to the Basel Convention on the Issue of Ship Scrapping (Annex)Basel Action Network (BAN)312.12 K
ILO/IMO/BC/WG.1/INF/3The need to set up an international eco-dismantling fundGreenpeace International43 K