Further Resources

Basel and Stockholm conventions Regional  Centres and FAO, UNEP regional offices

Basel and Stockholm conventions Regional Centres and FAO, UNEP regional offices

Basel and Stockholm conventions Regional  Centres and FAO, UNEP regional offices
Download
English: Download Emergency mechanism in English - PDF    
Basel Convention Regional and Coordinating Centres

Basel Convention Regional and Coordinating Centres

Basel Convention Regional and Coordinating Centres

The Basel Convention is the first global environmental agreement that has undertaken significant efforts to set up a network of Regional Centres. The BCRCs are uniquely positioned to steer regional efforts in hazardous waste management by linking global obligations with national development plans, and by integrating the environmentally sound management of hazardous waste into regional cooperation and development strategies.

The BCRCs have become the main instrument for enhancing the capacity of developing countries and countries with economies in transition to implement the Strategic Plan for the implementation of the Basel Convention.

The BCRCs have also been involved in activities aimed at facilitating the implementation of other multilateral environmental agreements in the regions, such as the Rotterdam and the Stockholm Conventions. The Ad Hoc Joint Working Group on enhancing cooperation and coordination among the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, has recognized that the coordinated use of the BCRCs by the three Conventions could help promote a life-cycle approach to the management of chemicals and wastes and strengthen capacity building efforts for the three Conventions.

In this context, a number of Basel Convention Regional Centres were nominated to be Stockholm Convention Regional Centres. The scope of activities of the BCRCs may therefore be widened, which represents an encouraging prospect and validating development for coordinated efforts in the management of chemicals and wastes.

Conscious of the need to address regional specificities and the need to facilitate the implementation of global issues at the regional level, countries foresaw the establishment of Basel Convention Regional and Coordinating Centres (BCRCs) at the time of the adoption of the Convention. In 1994, the Parties initiated the selection of the BCRCs. The first few years were dedicated to the institutional establishment of a growing number of Centres. Article 14 of the Convention addresses the issue of the establishment of the Centres to respond to the specific needs of the different regions in the world in terms of training and technology transfer for the minimization and environmentally sound management of hazardous and other wastes.

On several occasions, Parties reiterated the importance of the Centres in their assistance to implement the Basel Convention. In particular, reference is made to the 1999 “Basel Declaration on Environmentally Sound Management”. The Declaration recognized the need to further develop the Regional Centres as an efficient means to achieve the goals of environmentally sound management of hazardous and other wastes enshrined in the Basel Convention.

Download
English: Download in English - PDF

 

The Basel Convention Regional and Coordinating Centres at a glance

The Basel Convention Regional and Coordinating Centres at a glance

The Basel Convention Regional and Coordinating Centres at a glance

The Basel Convention benefits from a network of fourteen Regional and Coordinating Centres for Capacity Building and Technology Transfer (BCRCs). The Basel Convention is unique in setting up a regional network of autonomous institutions which operates under the authority of the Conference of the Parties, the decision-making organ of the Convention, composed of all the countries party to the Convention.

The BCRCs deliver training, dissemination of information, consulting, awareness raising activities and technology transfer on matters relevant to the implementation of the Basel Convention and to the environmentally sound management of hazardous and other wastes in the countries they serve. The specific activities are training workshops, seminars, pilot projects on the management of priority waste streams, the production of information material and guidelines.

Download
English: Download in English - PDF

 

Workshops in Africa and West Asia

February 2014
Third Global workshop on the facilitation of the entry into force of the Ban Amendment
Pretoria, South Africa, 18 - 19 February 2014

Third Global workshop on the facilitation of the entry into force of the Ban Amendment

Pretoria, South Africa, 18 - 19 February 2014


Venue:  Pretoria, South Africa

Background: The tenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Basel Convention adopted a decision on the Indonesian-Swiss country-led initiative to improve the effectiveness of the Basel Convention (decision BC-10/3). Section A of this decision addresses the entry into force of the Ban Amendment.

The Ban Amendment provides for the prohibition by each Party included in Annex VII of the Basel Convention (Parties and other States which are members of the OECD, EC, Liechtenstein) of all transboundary movements to States not included in Annex VII of hazardous wastes covered by the Convention that are intended for final disposal, and of all transboundary movements to States not included in Annex VII of hazardous wastes covered by paragraph 1 (a) of Article 1 of the Convention that are destined for reuse, recycling or recovery operations.

The decision BC-10/3 invites Parties to continue to take concrete actions towards encouraging and assisting Parties to ratify the Ban Amendment, including dpecific actions, such as the Nordic Initiative, to assist Parties facing legal and technical difficulties in ratifying the Ban Amendment and regional meetings.

Organizer(s): The workshop will be organized with support from the Basel Convention Regional Centre for English-speaking African countries in South Africa (BRCR-South Africa).

Working Language: The working language of the workshop in South Africa will be English.

More
September 2012
First global workshop on the facilitation of the entry into force of the Ban Amendment
Dakar, Senegal, 3 - 4 September 2012

First global workshop on the facilitation of the entry into force of the Ban Amendment

Dakar, Senegal, 3 - 4 September 2012


The workshop was organized with support from the Basel Convention Regional Centre for French-speaking countries in Africa and Stockholm Convention Regional Centre in Senegal (BCRC/SCRC-Senegal).

Workshop objectives

Providing relevant information to those Parties to the Convention that have not yet ratified, accepted, acceded to or approved the Ban Amendment and that were Parties to the Convention at the third session of the Conference of the Parties (COP3) which could facilitate entry into force of the Ban Amendment;

Facilitating information exchange between Parties to the Convention that have not ratified, accepted, acceded to or approved the Ban Amendment and between these Parties and the Parties that have ratified it.

More

October 2011
Stockholm, Rotterdam and Basel Conventions joint training in Côte d’Ivoire
Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, 3 - 13 October 2011

Stockholm, Rotterdam and Basel Conventions joint training in Côte d’Ivoire

Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, 3 - 13 October 2011


The Secretariats of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions are jointly implementing a programme in Africa to enhance the capacity of African Countries to monitor and control transboundary movements of hazardous chemicals and wastes and fight illegal traffic. In the framework of this programme, a series of training seminars will take place in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire in October 2011. The training will focus on enhancing the implementation of Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm conventions, prevention of illegal traffic of hazardous wastes and chemicals, the implementation of the WHO International Health Regulations and the environmentally sound management of MARPOL wastes. The training will be delivered to competent authorities, conventions focal points, the judiciary and other stakeholders involved to the control of transboundary movements of hazardous chemicals and wastes.

The seminars will conclude a pilot project that addressed priority actions identified by the government of Côte d’Ivoire after the dumping of toxic wastes in Abidjan in 2006.  The Basel Convention Regional Centre for French-speaking countries in Africa assumed the role of implementing agency for these activities, with support from the Secretariats. The pilot project was funded by the Quick Start Programme of the Strategic Approach to Chemicals Management (SAICM).

In the framework of the same pilot project, legal and technical experts undertook a “gaps and needs” analysis to assess the implementation and enforcement of the Basel, Stockholm and Rotterdam conventions, the International Health Regulations of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL). On the basis of the analysis and its associated recommendations, norms and regulations for the coordinated implementation of the three chemicals and waste conventions were developed and validated in a national consultation workshop. The upcoming training will also include a presentation of the draft texts to the authorities that are involved in the control of hazardous shipments of chemicals and wastes. The three Secretariats are cooperating to implement similar activities in other African Countries: in Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania. Cooperation is also being developed for similar projects in Gabon, Madagascar and Morocco.

 

September 2011
Transboundary Movements of E-Wastes to Africa and the Prevention of Illegal Traffic
Lagos, Nigeria, 13 - 15 September 2011

Transboundary Movements of E-Wastes to Africa and the Prevention of Illegal Traffic

Lagos, Nigeria, 13 - 15 September 2011


E-Waste Africa Project : National Training Workshop on Monitoring and Control of Transboundary Movements of E-Wastes and Used Equipment to Africa and the Prevention of Illegal Traffic

Introduction

E-waste has been identified as the fastest growing waste stream in the world. In 2005, the Basel Action Network (BAN) of USA produced a film titled “The Digital Dump: Exporting Re-Use and Abuse to Africa”. This was done with the active participation of the Basel Convention Coordinating Center for the African Region (BCCC-Nigeria). It was reported that about half a million used computers came in through the Lagos Ports every month. Out of these, 40% were imported from Europe, 40% from the United States of America and 20% from other countries. Furthermore, only 25 % of the imports were functional while the remaining 75% were junk or e-scrap.

Nigeria and Ghana have featured prominently in international print and electronic media in recent years as dumping ground for e-waste from Europe and USA. In reaction to the adverse media publicity, the European Union (EU) responded by commissioning the Secretariat of Basel Convention (SBC) E-waste Africa Project in 2009

Consequently, from January 2009, with the assistance of the Secretariat of the Basel Convention, the SBC E-Wastes Africa Project, funded by the EU, Norway,  the UK and Dutch Recyclers Association (NVMP), was initiated in Seven countries of Africa namely Benin, Nigeria, Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, Liberia, Tunisia and Egypt.

The project has the following objectives:

  • Enhance environmental governance of e-wastes in African countries;
  • Build capacity to monitor and control e-waste imports coming from the developed world, including Europe;
  • Protect the health of citizens;
  • Provide economic opportunities.

The project which is being implemented by, BCRC-Senegal, BCCC-Nigeria and BCRC-Egypt, IMPEL, EMPA and the Oko-Institute has four components namely:

  1. Study on flows in used and end-of-life e-products imported into: Benin, Ghana, Nigeria, Côte d’Ivoire and Liberia, from European countries
  2. National assessments on used and end-of-life e-equipment; National environmentally sound management plans
  3. Socio-economic study on the e-waste sector in Nigeria and Ghana
  4. Enforcement program on the monitoring and control of transboundary movements of used and end-of-life e-equipment and the prevention of illegal traffic in five African countries.

IMPEL -. The European Union Network for the implementation and Enforcement of European Law is executing the fourth component of the SBC E-waste Africa project with funding from the European Union.

Among the expected results of component four of the project is the training of enforcement officers on the monitoring and control of imports of e-waste at the ports of entry and to establish a network which would facilitate joint cooperation between enforcement authorities in exporting States in Europe and importing States in Africa.  

Consequently, the Federal Ministry of Environment with the assistance of IMPEL, and in collaboration with the SBC and BCCC-Nigeria, organised a 3 day national training workshop for enforcement officers on the monitoring and control of imports of e-waste at the ports of entry and to establish a network which would facilitate joint cooperation between enforcement authorities in exporting States in Europe and importing States in Africa.

In attendance were 48 participants made up of regulatory and enforcement officers representing the main stakeholder institutions such as the Federal Ministry of Environment (FMENV), National Environmental Standards and Regulation Enforcement Agency (NESREA), Nigeria Customs Service (NCS), Nigerian Police Force, Lagos State Environmental Protection Agency (LASEPA), Lagos State Waste Management Authority (LAWMA), Port Health Service of Federal Ministry of Health, Nigerian Navy, Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA), Federal Ministry of Defence, Experts from BCCC-Nigeria, SBC and IMPEL. Other stakeholders were representatives of the shipping agencies, Association of computer traders from Alaba and Ikeja markets and the media.

Opening Ceremony

Welcome address was given by the Director Pollution Control & Environmental Health FMENV represented by Engr. A.I Adefule Deputy Director FMENV Lagos Zonal Office who welcomed all participants and stated the purpose of the workshop which is to train relevant enforcement officers at the seaport and land , borders including other relevant stakeholder to monitor and control the transboundary movement of e waste from the developed countries. He stated that the Nigerian government is determined to combat the e waste stream and prevent the risk associated to our corporate health and environment. The session was followed by good will messages from the Executive Secretary of Secretariat of Basel Convention, Ms. Katharina Kummer represented by Tatiana Terekhova, the Director General NESREA-  Dr Mrs N.S Benebo represented by Mrs. M.A Amachree, The Customs Area Controller, Tin Can Island Port Mr. E. Edike represented by Dr C.E Agu, Mr Gerard Wolters inspector General for international Enforcement Cooperation VROM represented  Mr. Klaus Willke of IMPEL, and Executive Director of BCCC- Nigeria- Prof O. Osibanjo.

Also at the opening ceremony were the ACP Titilayo Kayode representing Inspector general of Police Mr Ringim, and SLT M.S Saidu representing the Nigerian Navy Headquaters, Joseph Sarfo Domfeh, Project Manager EU-Africa collaboration project.

The Honourable Minister of Environment Mrs Hadiza Ibrahim Mailafia, represented by Mrs. O.O. Babade Acting Director Pollution Control & Environmental Health FMENV, described the workshop as a welcome development in view of the fact that Nigeria had been a major recipient of e-waste in Africa. She said in line with the plan by the Ministry to avert this dangerous trend; the Ministry had developed a draft policy, guidelines and strategic plan on e-waste management and recently the federal government gazetted the regulations on electrical and electronic sector. She concluded her address by stating that the Ministry has concluded plans to establish a pilot project on e-waste recycling   in Nigeria.

Technical Papers

Presentations were made by national and international speakers. These included:

  1. Overview of SBC E waste African Project
  2. Overview of E waste management in Nigeria.
  3. International and regional policy and regulation relevant to WEEE,
  4. EU legislation on transboundary (waste) shipments relevant to WEEE,
  5. National Regulation and Guidelines on WEEE in Nigeria
  6. Introduction to the E-waste inspection and Enforcement Manual
  7. Port inspection procedures in Nigeria
  8. Cooperation and MOU with relevant Agencies in Nigeria
  9. Conception of Part 4 of the E- waste Inspection and Enforcement Manual

Film shows on toxic city and joint inspection of consignment at the ports were shown. Port excursion and group exercise were conducted.

Deliberations:

  1. E-waste was identified as the fastest growing waste stream in the world.
  2. Nigeria has been identified as a dumping ground for e-waste and it lacks the capacity to manage e-waste.
  3. Participants deplored the inadequate capacity, infrastructure and institutional mechanisms to support the process
  4. Participants noted that crude e-waste management occurs in the informal sector of the economy involving people who in their ignorance are exposed to toxins in e-waste thereby endangering their health and the environment.
  5. Participants observed that there is inadequate public education and awareness on the problems associated with the uncontrolled importation of near-end-of-life and end-of-life electrical electronic equipment (EEE) into the country, and the lack of clear distinction between e-waste and used EEE.
  6. Participants welcomed efforts made on information exchange on the transboundary movement of e-waste and the establishment of an interim e-waste enforcement network of the e-waste Africa project as well as the collaboration between Nigeria and its sub-regional neighbors as well as international partners, such as International Network on Environmental Compliance and Enforcement (INECE) and IMPEL
  7. The effort of the Nigerian Government was applauded for being the first country in Africa to have a specific legislation on electrical/electronic sector.
  8. Participants welcomed the ongoing process of registration of importers of UEEE by NESREA.
  9. Participants noted the need to put in place a take back system by producers /manufacturers for UEEE.
  10. Participants noted that the EU legislation on transboundary waste shipment is based on the Basel Convention. It also noted the non-domestication of the Basel Convention in Nigeria.
  11. Participants recognized the need for an MOU between Federal Ministry of  Environment, NESREA and NCS to facilitate activities at the port
  12. Participants noted the need for collaboration between relevant Government agencies at the sea ports and land borders.
  13. Participants were informed that NESREA has access to ASYCUDA++ of the NCS.
  14. Participants noted that enforcement officers are exposed to dangers during inspection due to non-availability and usage of safety equipment.

Recommendations

  1.  Enhance collaboration to implement the Basel Convention to meet the objectives set out therein.
  2. The Federal Ministry of Environment being the Competent Authority of the Basel Convention in Nigeria to ensure the domestication of relevant international laws and treaties such as the Basel Convention.
  3. There is need to expedite action on institutional capacity building to enhance cooperation on e-Waste management and the exchange of information between the key regulatory agencies (Toxic waste dump watch Committee).
  4. NCS needs to be supported in distinguishing between WEEE and UEEE.
  5. There is a need for awareness raising campaign to the general public and importers on the need for proper disposal on environmental sound management of e-waste.
  6. The Federal government to commit resources to support regulatory authorities to effectively operationalize the National E-waste Regulations, chemicals management strategies and other relevant interventions aimed at curbing the WEEE menace.
  7. NESREA certification to be a prerequisite on the opening of Form M by importers to curb illegal importation of WEEE
  8. Strengthen exchange of information between regulatory and enforcement officers both locally and internationally.
  9. FMENV to Promote policies which would encourage the procurement and import of ‘Green EEE’ in order to minimize the health and environmental impacts posed by WEEE from toxic components.
  10. FMENV to promote activities that would foster regional cooperation and facilitate the formation of common understandings.
  11. FMENV to promote the establishment of national, sub- regional and regional WEEE recycling facilities in compliance with applicable  environmental regulations;
  12. Strengthening the existing African Network on the control of illegal traffic of e-waste in and explore its synergy with the proposed INECE network for west Africaas well as IMPEL. Furthermore explore and effective funding mechanism and necessary infrastructure.
  13. Utilize the lessons learnt from the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM) process in signing of an MOU between the FMENV, NESREA, and NCS.
  14. Include e-waste management in the statutory NCS curriculum for understanding on current environmental trends.
  15. NESREA should be conversant with customs and port procedures.
  16. The Federal government to provide and enforce the use personal protective equipment and other safety equipment’s in the course of inspection at the ports.

Conclusion

Participants expressed satisfaction with the fruitful outcome of the training workshop. The Federal Ministry of Environment on behalf of the Government of Nigeria, expressed gratitude to the SBC, IMPEL, EU and BCCC-Nigeria for the assistance in organizing the workshop.

 

Mouvements internationaux de déchets électroniques vers l'Afrique et prévention du traffic illégal
Cotonou, Benin, 5 - 7 September 2011

Mouvements internationaux de déchets électroniques vers l'Afrique et prévention du traffic illégal

Cotonou, Benin, 5 - 7 September 2011


Compte rendu de l'atelier national de formation intitulé "Suivi et contrôle des mouvements internationaux de déchets électroniques vers l'Afrique et prévention du traffic illégal"

Sur l’initiative du Secrétariat de la Convention de Bâle appuyée par la Commission Européenne en collaboration étroite avec le Centre de Coordination de la Convention de Bâle pour l’Afrique au Nigéria,  les Centres Régionaux  de la Convention situés en Egypte, et au Sénégal, EMPA (the multidisciplinary research Institute for Material Science and Technology of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), OKO-Institute, IMPEL (Implémentation and Enforcement of Environemental Law), et le Ministère de l’Environnement, de l’Habitat et de l’Urbanisme, il a été organisé les 5, 6 et 7 août 2011 à l’INFOSEC de Cotonou au Bénin, un atelier de formation sur « suivi et contrôle des mouvements transfrontières de déchets d’équipement électriques et électroniques usagés vers l’Afrique et prévention du trafic illicite ». L’organisation de cet atelier de formation s’inscrit dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre de la Convention de Bâle sur les mouvements transfrontières de déchets dangereux et de leur élimination, adoptée à Bâle le 22 mars 1989 et ratifié par le Bénin le 16 octobre 1997.

Objectifs

Le présent atelier vise à :

  • Mettre en œuvre le projet de Stratégies de la Convention de Bâle relatifs aux déchets d’équipements électriques et électroniques (DEEE) en Afrique et;
  • Renforcer les capacités techniques des acteurs susceptibles de contrôler les mouvements transfrontières des équipements électriques et électroniques.

Participation

Cet atelier a regroupé environ vingt cinq (25) participants provenant de la Belgique, du Centre Régional de la Convention de Bâle au Nigéria, du Centre Régional de la Convention de Bâle pour les pays francophones, de quelques structures nationales telles que la Direction Générale de l’Environnement, la Police Environnementale, l’Agence Béninoise pour l’Environnement, la Police Sanitaire, le Département Environnement du Port, le Commissariat Spécial du Port, l’Interpol, la Société Béninoise des Manutentions Portuaires,  la Brigade de la Protection du Littoral et de la Lutte anti Pollution, la Direction Générale des Douanes, la Direction du Commerce Extérieur, la Direction de la Marine Marchande, et des entreprises privées telles que Bénin Contrôle, et l’ONG Envie Bénin.

Déroulement de l'atelier

Quatre temps forts ont marqué le déroulement de cet atelier : 

  1. la cérémonie d’ouverture ;
  2. le déroulement des travaux ;
  3. les recommandations de l’atelier ;
  4. la cérémonie de clôture.

Cérémonie d'ouverture

La cérémonie d’ouverture présidée par Monsieur Théophile C. WOROU, Directeur de Cabinet, Représentant le Ministre de l’Environnement, de l’Habitat et de l’Urbanisme, a été marquée par l’allocution de bienvenue du Directeur Général de l’Environnement, les messages des représentants de la Convention de Bâle du Nigéria et de IMPEL, puis l’allocution d’ouverture proprement dite du Directeur de Cabinet.

Dans son allocution de bienvenue, le Directeur Général de l’Environnement, le professeur Henri H. SOCLO a, au nom du Comité d’Organisation souhaité la bienvenue à tous les participants. Ensuite, il a porté à la connaissance des autorités présentes, les différentes structures qui participeront à cet important atelier de formation qui sont entre autres les structures intervenant dans la plate forme portuaire de même que toutes celles qui d’une manière ou d’une autre interviennent dans la chaine des e-Waste. Il a en outre fait remarquer qu’en dehors de la phase théorique contenue dans le programme de cette formation, il est aussi prévu une phase pratique qui se déroulera dans l’enceinte portuaire.

Pour finir, il a remercié les autorités portuaires et douanières pour toutes les facilités offertes à sa structure dans l’organisation de cet atelier et par la même occasion, invité les participants à l’assiduité afin que cette formation se déroule dans de très bonnes conditions.

Le Représentant du Directeur Exécutif du Centre Régional de la Convention de Bâle au Nigéria, Madame Bolanle AJAÏ, dans son intervention, a remercié le Bénin pour avoir organisé cet important atelier, le deuxième du genre en Afrique noire après celui du Ghana. Elle se réjouit de la prise de conscience des Etats Africains dans la lutte contre le transport illicite des déchets électriques et électroniques dont les effets néfastes sur l’environnement et la santé humaine ne sont à plus à démontrer. Elle a  ensuite, souhaité que le réseau qui est entrain d’être mis en place se pérennise et que tous les pays concernés renforcent leur collaboration en vue d’éradiquer le transport illicite de ces déchets. Pour finir, elle  a lancé un appel aux hommes de médias afin que les résultats de cet atelier soient diffusés sur toute l’étendue du territoire national.

Quant au représentant de IMPEL, Madame Simonne RUFENER, elle a au nom de sa structure, exprimé toute sa gratitude au Gouvernement Béninois en général et au Ministère en charge de l’Environnement en particulier, pour avoir bien voulu se mettre aux côtés des institutions organisatrices en vue de la tenue effective de cet atelier. Pour elle, le transport et le commerce illégaux de déchets d’équipements électriques et électroniques sont une source croissante de préoccupations à l’échelon international et, les pays d’origine et de destination de ces déchets recherchent tous, des moyens efficaces de détecter et de lutter contre le transfert de ces flux de déchets. A cet égard, a-t-elle poursuivi, il est curial de définir les approches stratégiques en matière d’inspection et d’application des lois nationales et internationales sans lesquelles les effets néfastes de ces transferts de déchets sur l’environnement, l’économie, la santé des travailleurs et de la population persisteront et continueront de croître.

Elle a en effet évoqué les expériences acquises par le réseau IMPEL en termes de collaboration transfrontière pour la surveillance et l’inspection de transferts de déchets, puis les nombreuses actions d’inspection ménées par le réseau en Europe, de même que des outils d’aide développés au profit des inspecteurs de première ligne et des programmes d’échange entre ces derniers. C’est dans cette perspective a-t-elle affirmé, que IMPEL a jugé opportun de partager son expérience avec cinq pays d’Afrique en la réitérant à chaque fois, telle qu’elle a été dispensée en Belgique et aux Pays Bas où 19 africains ont pris part pendant deux semaines au mois de septembre 2010. Elle a souhaité que cette formation d’échanges de connaissances des législations aussi bien nationales qu’internationales se poursuive et se pérennise en vue du développement d’un réseau et ce, conscient des possibilités et limites de chaque législation. Elle s’est dite heureuse de la tenue au Bénin de cette formation qui constitue l’occasion idéale de poursuivre le développement de cet important réseau et exhorte les participants à proposer au terme de cette formation des activités concrètes, gage du succès de cet atelier. Elle a par ailleurs, manifesté l’intérêt et l’entière disponibilité de sa structure à accompagner les pays Africains à développer des moyens efficaces et pratiques, de détecter et de lutter contre les transferts illégaux et leurs conséquences négatives sur la société. Au terme de ses propos, elle a réitéré ses vifs remerciements au comité d’organisation et à toutes les structures qui ont contribué à cette organisation pour que la formation soit une réalité.

S’agissant de l’allocution d’ouverture, le Directeur de Cabinet, Représentant le Ministre de l’Environnement, de l’Habitat et de l’Urbanisme, Monsieur Théophile C. WOROU, après avoir sacrifié à la tradition des souhaits de bienvenue aux participants, a apprécié l’intérêt qui est accordé aujourd’hui à la problématique des déchets d’équipements électriques et électroniques communément appelé e-waste.

Il a rappelé le contexte de la présente formation qui s’inscrit dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre de la Convention de Bâle qui vise à réduire le volume des mouvements transfrontières de déchets dangereux et à instaurer un système de contrôle des exportations et importations desdits déchets, ainsi que leur élimination.

Il a fait remarquer que s’il est évident que ces DEEE déversés dans les pays en développement par le truchement du commerce international sont sources potentielles d’emplois parce que contenant des métaux précieux comme l’or, l’argent, le cuivre et autres,  ces emplois sont incontestablement dangereux car non associés à des législations et pratiques écologiques.

Ensuite, il a rappelé aux participants que ces déchets contiennent des métaux lourds qui sont des substances très toxiques et par conséquent doivent théoriquement être traités conformément aux conventions internationales et réglementations nationales ou régionales. C’est pourquoi prenant la mesure du danger, le Programme des Nations Unies pour l’Environnement (PNUE) a tiré sur la sonnette d’alarme lorsque dans un rapport présenté en 2010, il prévient  que « la vente de produits électroniques dans des pays comme la Chine et l’Inde, l’Afrique ou l’Amérique latine, devrait exploser dans les dix prochaines années, ce qui pourrait avoir de graves conséquences environnementales » a-t-il fait savoir.

Poursuivant son intervention et pour illustrer les résultats de l’évolution rapide de la technologie, responsable des problèmes émergents que constituent la question des DEEE, le Directeur de Cabinet a livré quelques statistiques effrayantes qui placent la Chine en deuxième producteur de déchets électroniques au monde derrière les Etats Unis avec une production de 2,3 millions de tonnes par an ; l’augmentation des déchets d’ordinateurs en Afrique du Sud et en Chine soit 200 à 400% et 500% en Inde d’ici à 2020.

Il a par ailleurs exprimé son inquiétude de voir le continent africain, mal outillé au plan technologique et juridique, devenir la poubelle mondiale des e-Waste avec tous les risques qui y sont liés notamment pour la santé humaine et pour l’environnement.

Dans la suite de son allocution, il a fait constater aux participants à cet atelier que le choix porté sur eux n’est pas le fruit du hasard mais réside dans le rôle majeur qu’ils doivent jouer, en l’occurrence les acteurs portuaires et la douane, dans le suivi et le contrôle des mouvements transfrontières de déchets d’équipements électriques et électroniques usagés vers le Bénin.

Aussi, a-t-il fait allusion à quelques décrets pris au niveau national pour réglementer l’importation de certains produits. Au nombre de ceux-ci, il a cité :

  • le décret n°91-13 du 24 janvier 1991 portant réglementation de l’importation des produits de nature dangereuse pour la santé humaine et la sécurité de l’Etat ;
  • le décret n°2000-671 du 29 décembre 2000 portant réglementation de l’importation, la commercialisation et la distribution des matériels et biens d’équipements d’occasion et;
  • l’arrêté interministériel 2002 n° 002 du 08 janvier 2003 portant réglementation de l’importation des substances appauvrissant la couche d’ozone et des appareils et équipements usagés utilisant de telles substances.

Ces textes qui devraient permettre de gérer et de contrôler les mouvements transfrontières de certains produits et équipements dangereux usagés ou en fin de vie notamment ceux qui passent par le circuit formel.

Pour terminer ses propos il a salué au nom du Gouvernement béninois la présence à cet atelier de l’Union Européenne, des Gouvernements Belges et Néerlandais, des représentants du Centre Régional de la Convention de Bâle au Nigéria et au Sénégal, et le représentant de IMPEL de leur assistance technique et financière apportée pour appuyer aussi bien la consolidation du cadre juridique que le rapatriement si c’est nécessaire des déchets qui franchissent la frontière du Bénin.

Après avoir encouragé les participants à faire face à la complexité que constitue le circuit informel dans ce domaine, il les a exhorté à suivre avec assiduité en ayant à l’esprit qu’ils feront au terme de cette formation des propositions de réglementation et des programmes d’actions pour une gestion appropriée des déchets d’équipements électriques et électroniques au Bénin. C’est sur ces mots d’exhortation qu’il a déclaré ouvert ledit atelier de formation.

Déroulement des travaux

Cette étape a été  marquée par la présentation de communications, la visualisation des films documentaires et la phase pratique sur le terrain. Pour ce faire, un présidium de deux membres a été installé et se présente comme suit :

  • Président : Monsieur MARCOS Wabi, Chef du Service de la Prévention des Pollutions et
  • Coordonnateur du Sous-Programme Lutte contre la Pollution Atmosphérique
  • Rapporteur : Monsieur BIAOU Mathieu en service à la Direction Générale de l'Environnement. 

Les Communications

Elles ont porté sur : aperçu sur les E-Waste, introduction au projet « E- Waste Africa Project, législations, introduction au manuel d’application, procédure portuaire/douanière, structure de mise en œuvre, collaboration inter-agences, introduction à l’exercice pratique avec référence aux parties du manuel d’application, collaboration internationale et réseau puis outils de communication et réseau d’application.

 L’aperçu sur les E- Waste: Cette communication comporte un certain nombre d’éléments à savoir les données générales, les impacts sur la santé et l’environnement, les aspects socio économiques, les illustrations et la chaine nationale des e-waste.

Les données générales sur les e-waste ont été présentées par Monsieur MARC de Strooper. De sa présentation, il faut retenir les grandes données ci-après:

  • Dans l’Union  Européenne, les exportations de déchets sont multipliées par 7 depuis 1998 avec une augmentation de 5 à 7% par an du volume de DEEE;
  • En Belgique, sur environ 80% d’exportation, le contrôle portuaire à Anvers et Zeebrugge, a revélé sur 1100 controles en 2010, 30% de DEEE;
  • Plus de 72% de DEEE transitent par Anvers pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest (2009);
  • En définitive, environ 40 à 50 millions de tonnes par année de volumes de DEEE sont enrégistrés dont 10% exportés vers les pays qui sont en dehors de l’espace OCDE.

Les impacts sur la santé et l’environnement ont été évoqués et se resument comme suit:

  • pollution de l’air, du sol et de l’eau par les métaux lourds, les dioxines et les furannes, les poussières ;
  • augmentation de la concentration des PTB au fur et à mesure qu'ils remontent la chaîne alimentaire, atteignant ainsi des niveaux dangereux de PBT dans les organismes vivants, même en cas de libération en petites quantités ;
  • exposition des travailleurs aux substances chimiques dangereuses à travers l’ingestion et I’inhalation de la poussière, l'exposition cutanée et l'apport alimentaire occasionnant ainsi les maladies suivantes : maladies de l’estomac, dommages du poumon (fumées et métaux lourds), des cellules sanguines et des reins, retard mental dû à l'exposition au plomb, dégâts génotoxiques à cause des effets des PBDE sur les niveaux d'hormones stimulant la thyroïde, risque de cancer élevé à cause du stress oxydatif causé par l'exposition à des concentrations élevées de dioxines, de furannes et de PCB, et infections de la peau.

Les aspects socio économiques des e-waste : Dans son exposé, Monsieur Martin AINA, enseignant à l’Université d’Abomey-Calavi a relevé que l’une des difficultés liées à la gestion des DEEE est l’absence d’une méthodologie appropriée puis il a présenté quelques résultats obtenus au terme de ce diagnostic parmi lesquels on peut globalement retenir :

  • absence de réglementation spécifique sur les DEEE mis à part les accords internationaux  (convention de Bâle et celle de Bamako) que le Bénin a signés et ratifiés;
  • identification de la source de ces déchets;
  • évolution des EEE au Bénin;
  • identification des acteurs de cette filière qui sont en général des béninois suivis de quelques etrangers.

En conclusion de sa communication, on peut retenir que les grands importateurs n’ont pas voulu dévoiler leur chiffre d’affaire. Toutefois ceux qui ont bien voulu répondre aux questions situent leur chiffre d’affaire entre 10 millions et 100 millions de francs CFA et leur train de vie atteste de la rentabilité de la filière.

Les illustrations : quelques photos ont été présentées par Monsieur MARC de Strooper pour illustrer ses explications en ce qui concerne la situation des déchets d’équipements électriques et électroniques en Afrique de l’Ouest. Ces photos pour la plupart prises au Ghana montrent entre autres le dépôt de collection des DEEE, la combustion à ciel ouvert des câbles, le recyclage des DEEE, la récupération du plomb, le marché des ferrailles, le reconditionnement, le dépôt de composés dangereux sur le sol et dans l’eau et les réfrigérateurs mis au rebut après l'extraction manuelle de tous les métaux et composants contenant des métaux.

Introduction au projet « E- Waste Africa Project » : dans sa présentation, Madame Bolanle ADJAÏ, représentant de Directeur Exécutif du Centre Régional pour l’Afrique de la Convention de Bâle, a essentiellement énuméré les raisons qui ont poussé le Secrétariat de la Convention de Bâle à l’élaboration de cet important projet. Ces raisons essentiellement liées au transport illicite des DEEE ont été mises en exergue en 2005, par Basel Action Network (BAN) en collaboration avec BCCC-Nigeria à travers leur documentaire qui a montré l’ampleur des déchets d’équipements électriques et électroniques en Afrique. Ensuite, elle a rappelé les objectifs visés dans la mise en œuvre de ce projet.

Les  législations : en matière de réglementation des transports illicites des DEEE ont été présentées par MARC de Strooper. Dans sa présentation, il a évoqué les législations aussi bien régionales qu’internationales. En ce qui concernent les législations internationales il a cité la Convention de Bâle et le Protocole de Montréal qui sont signé et ratifié par le Bénin.

En ce qui concerne les législations régionales, il a évoqué la Convention de Bamako et le Règlement Européen sur le Transport des Déchets.

Introduction au manuel d’application : dans cette partie Monsieur MARC de Strooper a fait allusion aux procédures portuaires, à la communication et à la collaboration, aux inspections et enquêtes puis aux interventions.

Les Procédures Portuaires et douanières ont été expliquées par Monsieur MINCHI Pivaud, inspecteur de la douane. Il ressort de sa présentation que les mesures existantes ne permettent pas d’assurer un meilleur contrôle des DEEE parce que l’application des textes souffre des réalités socio-économiques du pays.

Les structures de mise en oeuvre de ces textes sont le Ministre en charge de l’Environnement et les autres structures intervenant dans le port e qui prennent part à cette formation.

Collaboration inter agences : Elle a été présentée par Madame Simonne RUFENER. Il ressort de sa présentation les points saillants ci-après : l’identification des acteurs dans la gestion/chaîne des déchets au port, la nécessité de collaboration, l’identification des partenaires de collaboration, les éléments d’un accord de collaboration, le niveau de collaboration et la confidentialité de l’information.

Collaboration internationale et Réseau: Dans sa présentation, Madame Simone RUFENER a insisté sur la collaboration internationale et la mise en reseau des pays bénéficiant de ce projet en y incorporant les pays de l’Europe d’où proviennent la plupart de ces déchets.

Réseau d’application UE-Afrique et Outil de communication : dans cette thématique présentée par Madame Simonne RUFENER, il a été question du lien entre l’Union Européenne (UE) et l’Afrique; les besoins notamment les points de contact entre l’Afrique et l’Europe, c’est-à-dire la liste des contacts au sein de l’UE et l’Afrique; le champ d’action du réseau essentiellement limité à la question des déchets et des EEEU puis des sommaires notamment des demandes de vérification, des alertes, des reprises d’expédition, des tendances et des bibliothèques contenant les outils et informations d’appoint (Directives, manuels et aperçu général des restrictions en matière d’importation).

Les interventions: presentées par Monsieur MARC de Strooper, elles concernent la  législation et l’expertise technique, les mesures à prendre pour retourner les déchets, le recyclage et l’élimination alternative, le suivi des preuves etc.

Visualisation des films documentaires.

Au cours de cet atelier, les participants ont visualisé un certain nombre de documentaires. Le premier documentaire enregistré en Allemagne a relaté la manière dont les EEEU sont conditionnés en Europe avant d’être envoyés en Afrique. L’expérience de la ville de Hambourg dans le conditionnement des EEEU a été projetée aux participants. Il faut retenir de ce film qu’en Europe, ces EEEU sont considérés comme des déchets et stockés dans un grand magasin pour être éliminés.

Le deuxième film a montré l’expérience du Ghana dans la gestion des EEEU. Il est remarqué à travers ce film que ces équipements composés en grande partie des ordinateurs et des appareils audio visuels sont pour la plupart amortis et beaucoup parmi d’entre eux ne fonctionnent plus. Il est aussi observé les techniques utilisées par les ghanéens pour éliminer et recycler ces équipements. En conclusion, il faut retenir que l’élimination de ces déchets se fait par incinération, rejet dans les lagunes ou même enfouis au sol, lesquelles pratiques portent atteinte aux composantes de l’environnement et posent aux populations un problème de santé publique.

Travaux pratiques.

La phase pratique sur le terrain a conduit les participants au Port Autonome de Cotonou pour faire des exercices pratiques sur les conteneurs chargés des EEEU et se rendre compte effectivement du conditionnement des EEEU en provenance des pays de l’Europe. Cet exercice pratique a consisté dans un premier temps avant l’ouverture du conteneur à identifier les gaz susceptibles d’y être rencontrés. Ce contrôle effectué en amont et en aval du conteneur a revelé la présence des Composés Organiques Volatiles (COV). Interpéllé, l’expert a expliqué que ce conteneur peut être inspecté. Après ouverture, quelques équipements composés de postes téléviseurs testés non fonctionnels. A partir de ce moment, l’expert a conclu que les objectifs visés par cet exercise ont été atteints car la plupart des appareils testés ne sont pas fonctionnels, preuve qu’il s’agit bel et bien de DEEE.

Ensuite, cette phase pratique a conduit les participants à la visite des lieux de travail du  récycleur, Monsieur BOGNON Alphonse. Il est observé dans ce centre des appareils audio visuels usagés envoyés dans son atelier par les clients pour être réparés. Prêté à notre interrogatoire par rapport à la gestion qu’il fait des plastiques et tubes catodiques, le récycleur a expliqué que les tubes cathodiques, une fois débarrassés de leur gaz sont enterrés au sol devant la maison qui abrite son atelier de reparation et les plastiques quant à eux sont entréposés. Il a fait savoir que ces derniers temps, les tubes cathodiques sont achetés par les Nigérians et convoyés vers une destination inconnue. Cette pratique d’enfouissement a interpellé la conscience de tous les participants qui, de façon unanime ont reconnu la nécessité de lutter contre le transfert dans notre pays de ces déchets dont la gestion devient un véritable problème de santé publique. 

Au terme de ces travaux, les participants ont exprimé un certain nombre de préoccupations dont les plus significatives sont:

  • l’organisation des exportations des DEEE;
  • le chiffre d’affaire des acteurs de la filière;
  • l’identification de l’autorité du contrôle des DEEE;
  • la synergie entre les dispositions de la Convention de Bâle et celles relatives à la constitution du 11 décemnbre 1991 du Bénin;
  • la présence sur le marché béninois des réfrigerants interdits utilisant les gaz interdits;
  • l’absence des textes juridiques de prise de sanctions;
  • la collaboration insuffisante entre le MEHU et les autres acteurs;
  • la légèrété dont font preuve les autorités portuaires aussi bien au Bénin qu’en Europe;
  • le non respect des dispositions de la Convention de Bâle surtout par les autorités des pays de provenance de ces EEEU.

 A la suite de ces interventions, les experts ont apporté quelques éléments de reponses parmi lesquels on peut globalement retenir que : le chargement dans les conteneurs des DEEE  se fait souvent à cotonou et dans d’autres villes du Bénin mais principalement à GBOGBANOU et à Akpakpa près de l’hôtel du lac.

En ce qui concerne le chiffe d’affaire des acteurs, l’expert a expliqué que les grands acteurs de cette filière n’ont pas voulu se prononcer par rapport à cette question. Mais que les enquêtes et ceux qui ont bien voulu répondre aux questions situent leur chiffre d’affaire entre 10 millions et 100 millions de francs CFA. Le rapprochement de cette valeur au train de vie des acteurs atteste de la rentabilité de la filière a conclu l’expert.

Le contrôle des DEEE se fait par le Ministère de l’Environnement, de l’Habitat et de l’Urbanisme qui est chargé de garantir un environnement sain à tous les béninois et qui représente le point focal de toutes les conventions relatives à l’environnement. Toutefois, il assure cette mission en collaboration avec d’autres structures lorsque le besoin se fait sentir. Pour le cas d’espèce, le contrôle se fera avec toutes les structures de sécurité impliquées dans cet atelier.

La présence sur le marché béninois des réfrigérants utilisant les gaz interdits a été justifiée par notre proximité avec le Nigéria d’où proviennent ces gaz de façon informelle.

 Travaux du groupe.

A la fin des débats les participants ont été répartis en trois groupes :

Premier groupe. Le premier groupe dirigé par Monsieur Alban d’Almeida et rapporté par Monsieur Franck AHOUADI, avait pour exercice de sélectionner parmi neuf conteneurs sur la base uniquement des documents, les conteneurs à inspecter ; le temps et les moyens disponibles étant très limités. Un examen minutieux desdits documents a révélé que seuls les conteneurs 1 et 6 pouvaient être identifiés. Alors que les sept autres ne disposent pas de numéros d’identification. Ainsi, faute de temps, les conteneurs 1 et 6 seront priorisés dans l’ordre indiqué pour une inspection du moment où la liste de colisage révèle  que dans le conteneur 1, la probabilité d’avoir les DEEE est plus élevée.

Groupe 2 : le groupe dirigé par Madame Etiennette DASSI et rapporté par Monsieur ADJADOHOUN Thibaut avait pour exercice

Groupe 3 : ce groupe dirigé par Monsieur BITI Théophile et rapporté par Monsieur Rosaire ATTOLOU, avait pour exercice d’observer des photos de contenu des conteneurs du point de vue environnemental.

A cet effet, onze photos ont été observées. Les différentes rubriques de cet exercice se présentent comme suit : description des produits, nombre estimatif d’articles, poids et valeur estimative des produits, mode d’emballage et analyse environnementale. Au terme de cette épreuve, le groupe a conclu que pour la plupart des photos, il y avait des équipements électriques et électroniques en vrac qu’il était difficile d’estimer en matière de valeur et de poids. L’analyse environnementale a révélé les risques de pollution de l’air, du sol et de l’eau.

Recommandations de l'atelier

A l’issue des travaux de l’atelier, les recommandations des participants après les divers échanges sont relatives aux aspects suivants :

  • la prise d’un décret portant réglementation  des DEEE ;
  • la mise en place d’un Comité de gestion et de suivi des transports des déchets d’équipements électriques et électroniques ;
  • l’adoption du manuel d’inspection et d’application de la réglementation sur les DEEE ;
  • le renforcement des capacités en matière de recyclage des DEEE ;
  • le renforcement de la collaboration entre tous les acteurs identifiés au niveau national, régional et internationnal ;
  • la nécessité de contrôler en collaboration avec la police environnementale au moins une fois par mois, les conteneurs renfermant des EEE  usagés;
  • la nécessité de développer et d’entretenir le réseau mis en place;
  • la nécessité de vulgariser les acquis de cet atelier de formation ;
  • l’organisation le 5 octobre 2011 de   la première réunion du Comité de gestion et de suivi des transports des DEEE. 

 

Cérémonie de clôture

Avant la cérémonie proprement dite, il a été procédé à la remise des attestations de formation aux participants par les organisateurs.

Ensuite, la cérémonie de clôture a enregistré quatre interventions à savoir les messages de fin des représentants des experts, du Directeur Exécutif du Centre Régional pour l’Afrique de la Convention de Bâle et du Centre Régional Francophone de la Convention de Bâle au Sénégal puis l’allocution de fin du représentant du Ministre de l’Environnement, de l’Habitat et de l’Urbanisme.

Dans son mot de fin, le Représentant du Directeur Exécutif du Centre Régional de la Convention de Bâle pour l’Afrique, Madame Bolanlé AJAÏ, a adressé ses vifs remerciements aux organisateurs puis aux participants pour leurs interventions et contributions qui ont permis à cette rencontre d’être l’une des plus fructueuses depuis l’opérationnalisation de ce projet. Elle a ensuite exhorté les participants béninois à travailler davantage le manuel mis à leur disposition en vue d’y intégrer les spécificités du Bénin. Pour finir ses propos, elle a réitéré ses remerciements à tout le peuple béninois pour cet accueil chaleureux.

Le Représentant des experts, Monsieur MARC de Strooper, a manifesté sa joie d’être venu travailler au Bénin, qui dispose des cadres d’une grande capacité dans le domaine des DEEE, au regard des résultats probants obtenus pendant ces trois jours de formation. Ensuite, il a lancé un appel à tous les participants afin qu’ils s’approprient le manuel de procédure sans occulter les difficultés qu’ils rencontreront au début de son utilisation. Toutefois, il a ajouté que l’équipe des experts reste disponible à accompagner le Bénin dans cette lutte contre le transport illicite des EEEU. Tout en ayant confiance en la capacité des participants béninois à mettre en application ce manuel de procédure, ce sera une grande satisfaction pour IMPEL de voir que le Bénin travaille activement dans la lutte contre le trafic des DEEE.

Quant au représentant du Centre Régional Francophone de la Convention de Bâle au Sénégal, Monsieur Michel SECK, il a exprimé toute sa satisfaction au Gouvernement du Bénin et au Ministère de l’Environnement, de l’Habitat et de l’Urbanisme pour avoir rendu effective la tenue de cet atelier qui est un défi. Il a par ailleurs, remercié toutes les structures impliquées dans l’organisation de cet atelier sans oublier les experts pour leur persévérance et tous les participants pour la qualité des débats et des résultats obtenus en si peu de jours. Pour finir, il a encouragé les participants à continuer dans leur engagement et leur sérieux afin que le Bénin et tous les autres pays concernés par le projet puissent effectivement asseoir ce réseau de lutte contre le transfert illicite des DEEE.

Le représentant du Ministre de l’Environnement, de l’Habitat et de l’Urbanisme, Monsieur Wabi MARCOS a, au nom du Ministre, remercié tous les participants dont il salue la détermination à aboutir aux résultats attendus. Il a rassuré les experts et les personnalités de la Convention de Bâle qui ont participé à l’atelier de formation dont les recommandations  seront transmises à l’autorité pour leur mise en œuvre. Il a ajouté qu’il ne doute pas des difficultés qui vont jalonner le chemin de mise en œuvre de ces recommandations mais qu’il reste persuadé de la disponibilité de chacun dans cette lutte contre le transfert illicite des DEEE. Tout en réitérant ses vifs remerciements aux experts, il a pris au mot les partenaires pour affirmer que le Ministre en charge de l’Environnement n’hésitera pas au moment opportun à bousculer les intérêts en vue de faire aboutir le projet. C’est sur ces mots d’assurance que le Bénin ne décevra pas l’Union Européenne, qu’il a déclaré closes les activités de l’atelier de formation sur « suivi et contrôle des mouvements transfrontières de déchets d’équipements électriques et électroniques usagés vers l’Afrique et prévention du trafic illicite.

 

                                                            Le Rapporteur,

                                                             Mathieu BIAOU

MOTION DE REMERCIEMENT

  • Considérant l’importance que prend le trafic illicite des déchets dangereux dans notre pays ;
  • Considérant la ratification par le Bénin de la Convention de Bâle et autres conventions concernant les substances chimiques dangereuses ;
  • Considérant les moyens réduits de notre pays à gérer efficacement les DEEE ;
  • Considérant l’intérêt que porte l’Union Européenne à la gestion des DEEE ;
  • Considérant le besoin de collaboration entre les structures aussi bien nationales qu’internationales ;

Nous participants à cet atelier national, remercions :

  • Les Autorités de l’Union Européenne, du Bénin et le Secrétariat de la Convention de Bâle pour l’organisation du présent atelier ;
  • Les autorités du Bénin pour toutes les facilités consenties pour l’organisation et la tenue effective des travaux pratiques dans l’enceinte portuaire ;
  • Les experts et tous les communicateurs pour la qualité de leurs exposés.

 

Fait à Cotonou le 07/09/2011

 

July 2011
Transboundary Movements of E-Wastes to Africa and the Prevention of Illegal Traffic
Tema, Ghana, 25 - 27 July 2011

Transboundary Movements of E-Wastes to Africa and the Prevention of Illegal Traffic

Tema, Ghana, 25 - 27 July 2011


E-Waste Africa Project :National Training Workshop on Monitoring and Control of Transboundary Movements of E-Wastes and Used Equipment to Africa and the Prevention of Illegal Traffic

Introduction

 

Information technology and the electronic industry has recently been regarded as the world’s largest and fastest growing manufacturing sector.  As a result of this remarkable growth, combined with the phenomenon of rapid product obsolescence, discarded electrical and electronic equipment or e-waste is now recognized as the fastest growing waste stream.

 

The used equipment are mostly exported to developing countries from advanced countries for many reasons which may be social, economic, and educational among others.  The concern about the increasing volumes of theses equipment imported into developing countries has been widely expressed and with the increasing awareness of the illegal shipment of these materials into some developing countries such as Ghana, countries have taken steps to assess the situation and to find ways to control the environmental and health menace posed by the influx of these equipment.

 

Consequently, from January 2009, with the assistance of the secretariat of the BC, the  SBC E-Wastes Africa Project,  funded by the EU, Norway the UK and NVMP, was initiated in Sevencountries of Africa namely      Benin, Nigeria, Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, Liberia, Tunisia and Egypt.

 

The project has the following objectives:

  • Enhance environmental governance of e-wastes in African countries;
  • Build capacity to monitor and control e-waste imports coming from the developed world, including Europe;
  • Protect the health of citizens;
  • Provide economic opportunities.

 

The project which is being implemented by, BCRC-Senegal, BCCC-Nigeria and BCRC-Egypt, IMPEL, EMPA and the Oko-Institute has four components namely:

  1. Study on flows in used and end-of-life e-products imported into: Benin, Ghana, Nigeria, Côte d’Ivoire and Liberia, from European countries
  2. National assessments on used and end-of-life e-equipment; National environmentally sound management plans
  3. Socio-economic study on the e-waste sector in Nigeria and Ghana
  4. Enforcement program on the monitoring and control of transboundary movements of used and end-of-life e-equipment and the prevention of illegal traffic in five African countries

 

Among the expected results of component four of the project is the training of enforcement officers on the monitoring  and  control of imports of e-waste at the ports of entry and to establish a network which would facilitate joint cooperation between enforcement authorities in exporting States in Europe and importing States in Africa.

 

Consequently, a kick – off meeting in Accra, Ghana in November 2009 with the theme “Clamping Down on Illegal Waste Shipments to Africa”  with technical support from IMPEL, provided the platform for Needs Assessment on the control of illegal traffic of used and end of life e-products in the West African sub-region. This was followed by a two week training of 19 regulatory officers in Europe during which the idea of training at the national level in participating African countries in 2011 was discussed.

Cognisant of the importance and urgency to move the discussion into practicality, concerned to protect human health and environment from the menace of WEEE and determined to halt the practise of using Ghana as a dumping ground for WEEE, Ghana with the assistance of IMPEL, and in collaboration with the SBC and BCRC, organised a 3 day  national training workshop

 For  enforcement officers on the monitoring  and  control of imports of e-waste at the ports of entry and to establish a network which would facilitate joint cooperation between enforcement authorities in exporting States in Europe and importing States in Africa.

The main objective of the workshop was to develop strategies for the  implementation of enforcement program in the 5 countries and was held  in Tema Ghana from the 25-27th July 2011. In attendance were regulatory and enforcement officers representing the main stakeholder institutions such as the EPA, CEPS, GPHA, GSB, Police, Civil Society groups including International Experts from Basel Convention Coordinating Center for the African region and IMPEL.etc.

 

 

Deliberations:

  • Participants shared their views on  recent developments in progress made to tackle the e-waste menace following the inception workshop and e-waste Africa project in Ghana.  They applauded efforts made by Ghana led by the EPA to address the waste menace working in partnership with stakeholder institutions  to facilitate the development of guidelines and policies, legislations to address the e-waste problem.
  • Participants deplored the lack of capacity, infrastructure and institutional mechanisms to support the process.
  • Participants noted that crude E-waste management occurs in the informal sector of the economy involving people who may be  ignorant of the hazards of exposure to toxins in e-waste with children and women being the   most vulnerable group
  • Participants observed that there is inadequate public education and awareness  on the problems associated with the uncontrolled importation of  near-end-of-life and end-of-life EEE into the country,  and  the lack of clear  distinction between e-waste and used EEE.
  • Participants welcomed  efforts made on information exchange on the transboundary movement of e-waste and the outcome of the collaboration between Ghana and its sub-regional neighbors as well as international partners in Europe, the USA and Canada. 
  • The meeting welcomed the training provided for the African team on e-waste management in the EU in 2010, and agreed to continue efforts  against the illegal transboundary movement of hazardous wastes, especially e-waste, through the continued dialogue among the implementing partners

 

Recommendations

 

  1. Enhance collaboration to implement the Basel Convention to meet the objectives set out therein.
  2. There is need to domesticate relevant international laws and treaties, such as the Basel Convention.
  3. The need to expedite action on the development of policies, guidelines and regulations on WEEE as well as a continued need for capacity building  within relevant stakeholders and  to  enhance cooperation on E-Waste management and the  exchange of information.
  4. Government should commit resources to support regulatory authorities to effectively operationalize the National E-waste Strategy and other relevant interventions aimed at curbing the WEEE menace.
  5. There is a need for cooperation between all  relevant national agencies on  ESM  of e- waste in the country
  6. Workshops/Fora should be convened regularly for sharing of experiences among regulatory and enforcement officers both locally and abroad.
  7. Promote policies which would encourage the use of ‘Green EEE’ in order to minimize the health and environmental impacts posed by WEEE.
  8. The need to promote  activities that would foster regional cooperation,and facilitate the formation of common understandings.
  9. Promote the establishment of  WEEE recycling facilities in compliance with national  environmental regulations;
  10. The resources dedicated to combating the e-waste menace, should also be extended to chemicals management. Establish an African network on the control of illegal traffic of e-wste in partnership with INECE
  11. Establish a sub-regional ECOWAS network like IMPEL  on the control of illegal traffic of e-waste and  transboundary movement of waste within the sub-region.

 

Conclusion

 Participants expressed  satisfaction with the fruitful outcome of the training workshop. The EPA on behalf of the Government of Ghana, expressed gratitude to the SBC, IMPEL, BCRC, EU for the assistance in organizing the workshop.

 

May 2011
Workshop on National Reporting and Inventory of the Basel Convention for Africa
Pretoria, South Africa, 24 - 26 May 2011

Workshop on National Reporting and Inventory of the Basel Convention for Africa

Pretoria, South Africa, 24 - 26 May 2011


The Secretariat of the Basel Convention together with the Basel Convention Regional Centre for the English-speaking Countries in Africa have organized a three-day workshop for Parties to mainly to English and French speaking African Parties of the Convention. The Workshop took place in Pretoria, South Africa, from 24 to 26 May 2011.

Representatives of twenty-two Parties took part in the workshop.

The event covered national reporting, waste classification, national inventory and national reporting from the national level perspective. Participants were invited to exchange knowledge and experiences through lectures, exercises and group discussions. Additionally, six countries from the region and a representative of Germany gave presentations on the status of implementation of the Convention, highlighting their processes, information on data collection, information on available facilities, lessons learned and the current issues they face in these areas.

The event served as an opportunity for Parties to exchange knowledge and experiences in the topics covered, through lectures, exercises and group discussions.

The European Commission, the government of Germany and the SBC have provided funds for the realization of this workshop.

Download the proceedings with the outcome of this event in English.

More

March 2009
Workshop on revised draft guidelines on BAT and provisional guidance on BEP
Dakar, Senegal, 23 - 25 March 2009

Workshop on revised draft guidelines on BAT and provisional guidance on BEP

Dakar, Senegal, 23 - 25 March 2009


Workshop's objectives:

  • Raising awareness on the guidelines on best available techniques and best environmental practices, in particular identifying priority category sources, and considering for implementation recommended alternative processes and their respective primary/secondary implementation steps;
  • Identifying possible regional commonalities in facing unintentional POPs emissions and to share experiences and lessons learned in using and/or disseminating the guidelines on best available techniques and best environmental practices.
October 2006
Workshop Aimed at Promoting Ratification of the Basel Protocol on Liability and Compensation
Cairo, Egypt, 30 October - 1 November 2006

Workshop Aimed at Promoting Ratification of the Basel Protocol on Liability and Compensation

Cairo, Egypt, 30 October - 1 November 2006


Regional Workshop Aimed at Promoting Ratification of the Basel Protocol on Liability and Compensation for Damage resulting from Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal.

Download the report:

 

June 2006
Workshop on the Rotterdam Convention
Pretoria, South Africa, 19 - 23 June 2006

Workshop on the Rotterdam Convention

Pretoria, South Africa, 19 - 23 June 2006


The consultation was held in the Burgers Park Hotel, Pretoria, South Africa. A total of 26 participants from ten countries attended the consultation; one participants each from Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Ghana and Nigeria; two each from Swaziland and Zimbabwe; three participants from Malawi, four from Zambia and six from South Africa The opening session was addressed by Ms Zolile Mvusi Acting Chief Director: Pollution & Waste Management, Department of Environment and Tourism, South Africa (host country); Ms Sheila Logan, Rotterdam Convention Secretariat and Dr John Mbogoma, Executive Director, Basel Convention Regional Centre Pretoria (host organisation).

The consultation was structured into eight sessions: Opening; Introduction to the Rotterdam Convention; Ratification; Prior Informed Consent Procedure; Information Exchange; Integration with ongoing chemicals management activities; Reviewing element of national plans and next steps and Wrap-up. The reports of the break out groups was presented and discussed in plenary and comments were included in the final
report. The consultation was officially closed at 12:30, 23 June 2006 with closing remarks from, Sheila Logan, Dr John Mbogoma and participants.

Responding to the challenges presented by health effects of chemicals and pesticides governments around the world agreed to the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International trade in 1998. The treaty promotes shared responsibility and cooperative efforts between exporting and importing countries for managing chemicals that pose significant risks enabling human health and environmental protection. Environmentally sound management of these chemicals are encouraged when its use is permitted. The Convention provides and shares accurate information on the characteristics, potential dangers, handling and safe use of these chemicals.

Download the report:

 

April 2006
Settlements and Design of Solid Waste Management System for Gaza
Cairo, Egypt, 29 April - 4 May 2006

Settlements and Design of Solid Waste Management System for Gaza

Cairo, Egypt, 29 April - 4 May 2006


UNEP organized the “Train the Trainer Workshop for Palestinian Experts” working on the removal of settlement debris (RSD) project. UNEP arranged three external experts (Mike Cowing, David Smith and Steve May) for the workshop. UNDP arranged to bring in 20 participants, 15 from UNDP, 4 from PEQA and 1 from GTZ.

Download the report:

 

December 2005
Sub-Regional Workshop on the Coordinated Implementation of Chemicals and Hazardous Wastes Convention
Muscat, Oman, 10 - 12 December 2005

Sub-Regional Workshop on the Coordinated Implementation of Chemicals and Hazardous Wastes Convention

Muscat, Oman, 10 - 12 December 2005


Workshop's objectives:

  1. Co-organize the Workshop in cooperation with other UNEP's offices, Swiss agency and Oman's MOE.
  2. Represent UNEP-ROWA in the Workshop.
  3. Deliver openning and closing statements.
  4. Present two paper on behalf of Rotterdam & Stockholm Conventions Secretariats, and 1 paper on Montreal Protocol & Green Customs Initiative.
  5. Chair Plenary discussion & Facilitate the Workshop Working Groups.
  6. Provide logistical & administartive support during the Workshop

Download the report:

 

October 2005
Conclusion of the PCBs Inventory Project for SADC Countries and Training on Action Plans for PCBs
Arusha, Tanzania, 26 - 28 October 2005

Conclusion of the PCBs Inventory Project for SADC Countries and Training on Action Plans for PCBs

Arusha, Tanzania, 26 - 28 October 2005


In 2003, fourteen PCB inventory projects, funded through the Canada POPs Fund, France, Switzerland and the United States of America, were launched in fourteen SADC member countries. These were Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

The overall aim of these projects was to facilitate a greater awareness of the PCB issue within the SADC and to catalyze efforts by enhancing national capacities for the environmentally sound management of POPs, with special regard to PCB-containing equipment and PCBcontaining waste through the development of national inventories.

The PCB inventory projects were managed by UNEP Chemicals in cooperation with the Secretariat of the Basel Convention. A regional project coordinator based at the Environmental Council of Zambia coordinated all project work within the SADC region and provided support for the ongoing inventory work.

Download the report:

 

Assessment of Existing Capacity and Capacity Building Needs to Analyse POPs in Developing Countries
Pretoria, South Africa, 4 - 5 October 2005

Assessment of Existing Capacity and Capacity Building Needs to Analyse POPs in Developing Countries

Pretoria, South Africa, 4 - 5 October 2005


UNEP Chemicals together with the Basel Convention Regional Center for English-Speaking African Countries held a Regional Workshop to assess existing capacity and capacity building needs to analyze Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in developing countries. The 3-day workshop was held in Pretoria, South Africa, in the Burgers Park Hotel.

This workshop was held in the framework of the UNEP/GEF “Assessment of Existing Capacity and Capacity Building Needs to Analyse POPs in Developing Countries”. The project is co-financed by contributions from the governments of Canada, Germany and Japan. This two-year project focuses on country needs relative to POP laboratory analyses, in order to comply with the Stockholm Convention in a sustainable way.

Download the workshop report:

August 2005
Enviromentally Sound Destruction of POP and Decontamination of POP Containing Wastes (Arab states)
Amman, Jordan, 28 - 31 August 2005

Enviromentally Sound Destruction of POP and Decontamination of POP Containing Wastes (Arab states)

Amman, Jordan, 28 - 31 August 2005


The Secretariat of the Basel Convention, UNEP Chemicals, World Health Organization (WHO), Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), the Basel Convention Regional Centre for Arab States based in Cairo (BCRC-Cairo), and the Government of Jordan have jointly organized the above-mentioned regional workshop in Amman from 28 to 31 August 2005.

The meeting in Amman was the second of that type after a similar regional workshop was organized for South American States in Sao Paolo, 06-10 December 2004 by the Basel Convention Regional Centre based in Argentina. The workshop provided training to 34 Government delegates from mainly Ministries of Environment and Ministries of Health of 19 countries in the region on the main aspects of the preparation and implementation of POPs waste disposal operations as developed in the Basel Convention General Technical Guidelines for the ESM of POPs Containing Waste (2004). Training was also delivered on the Stockholm Convention Draft Guidelines on Best Available Techniques and Provisional Guidance on Best Environmental Practices Relevant to Article 5 and Annex C as well as the FAO Guidelines on Pesticides Management and Their Safe Disposal.

The technologies and techniques qualified as environmentally sound in the Basel Convention General technical guidelines for the ESM of POPs containing waste (2004) were reviewed in a comprehensive and systematic manner, including with an indication of the operating conditions and the costs involved. A decision making model for the preparation of POPs waste disposal operations and for the selection of POPs waste treatment/destruction technologies developed by the Secretariat of the Basel Convention was introduced to participants through practical training exercises with a view to being utilized in their respective countries.

The topics addressed represent some of the most critical aspects of the implementation of the above-mentioned conventions as they engage the parties for long-term planning, priorization of activities in the context of their hazardous waste national management plans, and substantial financial commitments.

Some of the main recommendations made by the participants to the meeting include to study the feasibility of the development of a regional approach for the environmentally sound management of POPs as wastes, the need for improved monitoring and control of transboundary movements of chemicals and hazardous waste in the region and, enhanced training both at the regional level and the national level to assist parties in the conduct of POPs waste disposal programmes.

A site visit to the Pesticides Residue and Formulation Analysis Laboratories of the Jordanian Ministry of Agriculture was also included in the programme.

Download the report in Arabic or English

 

February 2005
Implementation of the Stockholm Convention and Synergies with Others Related Agreements
Cairo, Egypt, 21 - 24 February 2005

Implementation of the Stockholm Convention and Synergies with Others Related Agreements

Cairo, Egypt, 21 - 24 February 2005


Participants could benefit from the early establishment of national implementation plans, according to Article 7 of the Convention, and would therefore be able to fulfill the requirements of the Convention.

In this respect, the UNEP chemicals is organizing a chain of regional workshops to support the implementation of Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic pollutants. Egypt was selected to host the Regional workshop for the Arab countries and Islamic Republic of Iran in the cultural center (Cairo House), the Ministry of State for Environmental Affairs, Egypt, during the period 21-24 Feb. 2005. This workshop was organized in the framework of the UN Chemical Capacity-building program, that basically aims at providing technical assistance to developing countries to support their capacities in the field of establishing national programs for chemical management and implementation of international Conventions, such as Stockholm Convention on persistent Organic pollutants, Rotterdam convention on prior- Informed consent procedure for certain hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade and Basel Convention.

Download the report:

 

November 2004
Conclusion of the PCBs Inventory Project for SADC Countries and Training on Action Plans for PCBs
Maputo, Mozambique, 8 - 12 November 2004

Conclusion of the PCBs Inventory Project for SADC Countries and Training on Action Plans for PCBs

Maputo, Mozambique, 8 - 12 November 2004


In 2003, fourteen PCB inventory projects, funded through the Canada POPs Fund, France, Switzerland and the United States of America, were launched in fourteen SADC member countries. These were Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

The overall aim of these projects was to facilitate a greater awareness of the PCB issue within the SADC and to catalyze efforts by enhancing national capacities for the environmentally sound management of POPs, with special regard to PCB-containing equipment and PCBcontaining waste through the development of national inventories.

The PCB inventory projects were managed by UNEP Chemicals in cooperation with the Secretariat of the Basel Convention. A regional project coordinator based at the Environmental Council of Zambia coordinated all project work within the SADC region and provided support for the ongoing inventory work.

Download the report:

 

August 2004
Successful Case Studies of Recycling, Reuse and Resource Recovery Methods
Ibadan, Nigeria, 9 - 12 August 2004

Successful Case Studies of Recycling, Reuse and Resource Recovery Methods

Ibadan, Nigeria, 9 - 12 August 2004


Regional workshop on Successful case studies of Recycling, Reuse and Resource Recovery Methods towards the Environmentally Sound Management of Hazardous Wastes and Implementation of Basel Convention in Africa.

Needs:

It was identified that sharing of information with African Experts on successful Technologies proven to have worked in other regions, on the Environmentally Sound Management of hazardous Waste to promote the development after and application of such technologies in the African Regions would educate parties and lay a foundation for future developmental projects in the African Regions.

The workshop fostered partnerships between the four Basel convention regional centers in Africa, some developed countries, BCRCs’ in other regions, national expert in the region and industry towards the development of best practices and possibly the development of Small & Medium Enterprises (SME’s) out of the project to be showcased at the workshop. The project was also needed to develop a:

  1. Network of Experts in the Region knowledgeable in Technologies for sound waste management
  2. Database on best practices and environmental sound technologies for hazardous waste management and applicable in the region.

Results:

A number of successful hazardous waste recycling, reuse and resource recovery projects with improved environmental and public health effects in the participating countries that have embarked on the projects identified.

Documents: