Further Resources

Where are WEEE in Africa? Findings from the Basel Convention E-waste Africa Programme

Where are WEEE in Africa? Findings from the Basel Convention E-waste Africa Programme

Where are WEEE in Africa? Findings from the Basel Convention E-waste Africa Programme

Information Communication Technology (ICT) has revolutionized modern living, international business, global governance, communication, entertainment, transport, education, and health care. This has been driven by unprecedented high volumes of production and usage of consumer electronic products, in particular, personal computers, mobile phones, and television sets. Access to ICT has been identified as an indicator of a country’s economic and social development. The difference in access to ICT between developed and developing countries is commonly referred to as the “digital divide”. Africa has been undergoing rapid ICT transformation in recent years, attempting to bridge this divide by importing second-hand or used computers, mobile phones, and TV sets from developed countries. The countries of the region, however, lack the infrastructure and resources for the environmentally sound management (ESM) of electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) arising when such imports  reach their end-of-life.

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English: Download Where are WEEE in Africa? Findings from the Basel Convention E-waste Africa Programme in English - PDF French: Download Where are WEEE in Africa? Findings from the Basel Convention E-waste Africa Programme in French - PDF

 

Pan-African Forum on E-waste

Pan-African Forum on E-waste

Pan-African Forum on E-waste

The growing e-waste volumes generated worldwide together with the lack or even absence of well-organized collection and management systems in Africa, where a disproportionate amount of this waste ends up, threatens Africa’s environment, its national economies and the health of local communities. In many African countries e-waste is routinely disposed on uncontrolled dumpsites, where waste volumes are periodically reduced by setting them on fire, causing a range of toxic substances to be released, heavily contaminating air, soil and water resources. Even unburned, in tropical climate, many e-waste fractions will soon release major pollutants, damaging human and environmental health. The serious consequences of this mounting environmental problem are now starting to attract the widespread public attention.

The Secretariat of the Basel Convention is pleased to announce the Pan-African Forum on E-waste to be held from 14 to 16 March 2012 in Nairobi, Kenya.

This two and a half day forum is being organized with the support of Hewlett-Packard and Dell. The forum aims to bring together relevant stakeholders from the governments of Africa, international organizations, academia and the private sector. The forum seeks to identify possible options for a sustainable solution to e-waste in Africa by developing a clear perspective on an environmentally sound e-waste management framework applicable in the African context. Forum participants will discuss the need for regulatory frameworks and ways of establishing or strengthening national, regional and international collaboration.

Join us in Nairobi and be part of a new initiative to address the e-waste problem facing Africa!

Agenda

E-waste Africa Project page

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Webinar on E-waste Material Recovery and Recycling: An example of Concrete Solutions in Asia

Webinar on E-waste Material Recovery and Recycling: An example of Concrete Solutions in Asia

Webinar on E-waste Material Recovery and Recycling: An example of Concrete Solutions in Asia

Schedule and registration

Date and Time
(Geneva time: UTC/GMT+1 hours)
Please register a few days in advance of the webinar.
To register, please use the following link:
Thursday, 19 December at 4 pm
No recording

More than 60 types of metals and other materials are contained in waste computing equipment and more generally in E-waste. These are primary constituents such as steel, minor constituents such as silver, and micro or trace constituents such as gold. End-of-life computing equipment should be re-used, if possible. Otherwise it should be sent for material recovery and recycling at facilities that can recycle electronics in an environmentally sound manner. Only as a last resort it should be sent for final disposal.

The Partnership for Action on Computing Equipment (PACE) developed the “Guideline on Environmentally Sound Material Recovery and Recycling of End-of-Life Computing Equipment” that was adopted by the Basel Convention COP-11 in 2013.

The purpose of this guideline is to describe the chain of steps that should be taken in order to ensure environmentally sound management in material recovery facilities that recycle electronics, and to encourage operators at each step to know about, work with, and take their responsibility for human health, safety and the environment, so that the entire value chain works in both an economically and environmentally sustainable manner.

Objective

Come and learn how Taiwan, province of China,  established its E-waste management system and on how rare trace materials, like gold, or bulk plastics, can be recovered and recycled from end-of-life computing equipment and more generally E-waste. This webinar will present examples of E-waste management systems complying with the PACE “Guideline”.

Contents

  1. Introduction – (5 min).
  2. Presentations:
    • PACE-Introduction - BRS Secretariat - (10 min.)
    • E-waste Management in Taiwan, province of China, – (20 min.)
  3. Questions and Answers – (25 min.)

Target group

Basel Convention Focal Points, Basel Competent Authorities, Basel Convention Regional and Coordinating Centres, OEWG9 participants, Stockholm Convention focal points and points of contact, members of the POPRC, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), recyclers and their associations, government officials and regional/local authorities dealing with e-waste management and any other interested persons.

When you register, you will be given additional information regarding the system requirements and instructions on how to log in to the webinar.

Electrical and Electronic Waste (E-Waste)

The Nairobi Declaration on the Environmentally Sound Management of Electrical and Electronic Waste and decision IX/6 adopted by the ninth meeting of the Conference of the Parties gave a mandate to the Secreatariat to implement a workplan for the environmentally sound management of e-waste.

The workplan included activities in the following work areas: